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(last updated 30 Jun 2017)

Contents:

This page provides information on recently published rules or rules under development, covering the operation and decommissioning of uranium mines and mills and the management of uranium mine wastes and mill tailings.

> see also:


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Federal

Canada releases Discussion Paper on review of environmental and regulatory processes

The Government of Canada has released a discussion paper that outlines its proposed approach to environmental and regulatory processes.
Comments must be submitted by August 28, 2017.
> View: Natural Resources Canada release , June 29, 2017
> View: Update on the Review of Environmental and Regulatory Processes
> View: Environmental and Regulatory Reviews: Proposed Approach

 

CNSC invites comment on draft Regulatory Document 'Safeguards and Nuclear Material Accountancy'

> Submit comments by May 8, 2017.
> View CNSC release March 9, 2017
> View/Download: Draft REGDOC-2.13.1 Safeguards and Nuclear Material Accountancy , March 2017

 

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission invites comment on draft Regulatory Document 'Reporting Requirements for Non-Power Reactor Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills'

> Submit comments by November 9, 2016 (Comment period extended).
> View CNSC release July 11, 2016
> View/Download: Draft REGDOC-3.1.2 Reporting Requirements for Non-Power Reactor Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills , June 2016

 

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission issues Discussion Paper on Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning for comment

> Submit comments by November 2, 2016 (Comment period extended).
> Download Discussion Paper DIS-16-03, Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning , CNSC, May 13, 2016

 

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission issues Discussion Paper on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry for comment

> Submit comments by September 26, 2016 (comment period extended).
> View/Download: Discussion Paper DIS-16-02, Radiation Protection and Dosimetry , CNSC, April 29, 2016

 

Groups slam Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission for acting like nuclear lobby organization rather than independent regulator

> View here

 

CNSC asks licensees to improve reporting of unplanned events

"While CNSC staff are satisfied with actions taken by licensees during unplanned events to protect workers, the public and the environment, staff are concerned with delays in disclosing events to the public. CNSC staff are also concerned that licensees' reporting processes may not include provision for timely notification and reporting to the CNSC Duty Officer."
> Download CNSC letter Feb. 25, 2016 (135k PDF)

 

CNSC invites comment on draft standard "Establishing and implementing action levels to control releases to the environment from nuclear facilities"

The establishment and implementation of action levels described in this Standard are applicable for nuclear and hazardous substances identified in an effluent monitoring program (i.e., CSA N288.5) during normal operations over the lifecycle of a nuclear facility.
Submit comments by Apr 23, 2016.
> View draft standard: Establishing and implementing action levels to control releases to the environment from nuclear facilities (New Standard) , Feb. 23, 2016 (requires login)

 

CNSC issues REGDOC-3.5.1, providing overview of Licensing Process for Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills

This document provides an overview of the licensing process for Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills in Canada, taking into consideration the requirements of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and associated regulations.
REGDOC 3.5.1 supersedes INFO-0756, Licensing Process for New Nuclear Power Plants in Canada (May 2008) and INFO-0759 Revision 1, Licensing Process for New Uranium Mines and Mills in Canada (August 2010).
> View/Download REGDOC-3.5.1 , April 2015

On May 15, 2017, CNSC issued version 2 of this REGDOC:
> View CNSC news release May 15, 2017

 

CNSC invites comment on Discussion Paper: Proposal to Amend the Nuclear Non-proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations

Please submit your feedback by July 2, 2015.
> View CNSC release Mar. 4, 2015
> View DIS-15-01 Web page

 

CNSC invites comment on Discussion Paper: Modernizing the CNSC's Regulations

Submit comments by May 29, 2015 (comment period extended).
> View CNSC release Nov. 17, 2014
> Download Discussion Paper DIS-14-02: Modernizing the CNSC's Regulations (493k PDF)
> Access CNSC consultation page on DIS-14-02

 

CNSC issues regulations for Aboriginal Engagement

On Feb. 12, 2016, CNSC published REGDOC-3.2.2, Aboriginal Engagement.
> View CNSC release Feb. 12, 2016
> View Document History of REGDOC-3.2.2, Aboriginal Engagement (CNSC)
> Download REGDOC-3.2.2, Aboriginal Engagement (323k PDF - CNSC)

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is asking the public to provide their comments on draft REGDOC-3.2.2, Aboriginal Engagement.
Submit comments by February 16, 2015.
> View CNSC release Oct. 15, 2014

 

CNSC invites comments on draft regulations for Environmental Assessments

Submit comments by July 30, 2014 (comment period extended).
> View CNSC release Apr. 30, 2014
> View Document History of REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection (CNSC)
> Download Draft REGDOC-2.9.1 Environmental Assessments (571k PDF - CNSC)

On Nov. 30, 2015, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) invited comments on a revised draft "REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Policy, Assessments and Protection Measures".
Submit comments by March 29, 2016.
> View CNSC release Nov. 30, 2015
> Download Draft REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Policy, Assessments and Protection Measures (850kB PDF)
> View Document History of REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection (CNSC)

On Dec. 19, 2016, CNSC published the final REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Principles, Assessments and Protection Measures.
> View CNSC release Dec. 19, 2016
> Download REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Principles, Assessments and Protection Measures
> View Document History of REGDOC-2.9.1 (808k PDF)

On April 28, 2017, CNSC published Version 1.1 of the regulatory document, including administrative updates.
> Download REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Principles, Assessments and Protection Measures, version 1.1 (816k PDF)

 

CNSC issues regulations for import and export of nuclear items and uranium

Submit comments by April 29, 2014.
> View CNSC release Feb. 28, 2014

> View CNSC release Sep. 1, 2016
> View/Download REGDOC-2.13.2

 

Canada amends list of activities that warrant preparation of environmental assessments

The Minister of the Environment has finalized amendments to the Regulations Designating Physical Activities (the project list) "to ensure that federal environmental assessments are focused on those major projects with the greatest potential for significant adverse environmental impacts to matters of federal jurisdiction".
The project list identifies the physical activities that constitute a "designated project" which may require an environmental assessment under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012.
> View Public Notice: Amendments to the Regulations Designating Physical Activities (Project List) , Oct. 24, 2013 (CEAA)

 

Canada eases foreign ownership restrictions for uranium mines

Canada has agreed to waive for European companies a longstanding requirement that buyers take on a Canadian partner in uranium mines, a move that may spur greater investment in developing the country's rich uranium reserves. The move, part of the Canada-European Union free trade agreement announced on Friday (Oct. 18), comes after intense lobbying from France-based Areva SA and Anglo-Australian Rio Tinto Plc for Canada to scrap the Cold War era policy.
Canada, the world's second biggest producer of uranium behind Kazakhstan, currently restricts foreign companies from owning more than 49 percent of any uranium mine. There are no ownership restrictions on foreign participation in exploration. Lifting the requirement for European companies would appear to benefit Areva, in which the French government owns a controlling stake. Areva owns the Kiggavik project in the northern Canadian territory of Nunavut. (Reuters Oct. 18, 2013)

 

CNSC invites comment on proposal to amend Canada's Radiation Protection Regulations

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is asking the public to provide their comments on Discussion Paper DIS-13-01, proposals to amend the Radiation Protection Regulations. The discussion paper proposes amendments to existing sections of the Regulations, and offers new requirements for radiation detection and measurement instrumentation, and responsibility for radiation protection. These amendments would harmonize the Regulations with updated international standards. They would also clarify requirements and address gaps identified in light of the nuclear incident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.
Please submit your feedback by December 9, 2013.
> View CNSC release Aug. 9, 2013
> View History of Discussion Paper DIS-13-01
> Download Proposals to Amend the Radiation Protection Regulations, Discussion Paper DIS-13-01 , August 2013 (445k PDF)

Submit feedback on comments received by February 28, 2014.
> Download comments received (18.6MB PDF)

 

Canada to "streamline" review process for major economic projects

On April 17, 2012, the Harper Government announced, as part of Economic Action Plan 2012, its plan for Responsible Resource Development, "which will streamline the review process for major economic projects".
> View Canada's Economic Action Plan : Responsible Resource Development

CNSC invites comment on Discussion Paper DIS-12-04, Regulated Timelines: Proposed Amendments to the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations and the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations

The Government of Canada is "strengthening Canada's world-class protection of the environment" by setting legally binding timelines for environmental assessments, panel reviews, and key regulatory permitting processes.
The comment period ends on August 10, 2012.
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-28, July 10, 2012
> View Discussion Paper DIS-12-04

CNSC introduces 24 month timeline to "streamline" review process for nuclear facility and uranium mine and mill applications

"These new regulations [...] were initiated as part of the Government of Canada's Responsible Resource Development plan to modernize Canada's regulatory system for major projects, to create jobs, growth and long-term prosperity [...]".
> View CNSC release Jan. 2, 2013
> View Regulations Amending the Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations (Regulated Timelines) (Canada Gazette Jan. 2, 2013)

 

CNSC releases regulatory document RD/GD-99.3, Public Information and Disclosure

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has published regulatory document RD/GD-99.3, Public Information and Disclosure. RD/GD-99.3 sets out the CNSC's requirements and guidance related to public information programs, including a public disclosure protocol for applicants and licensees of Class I, as well as certain Class II nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills. The public disclosure protocol is a necessary component in a modern public information program for major nuclear facilities.
RD/GD-99.3 replaces Regulatory Guide G-217, Licensee Public Information Programs, January 2004.
> View CNSC release Mar. 23, 2012
> Download RD/GD-99.3, Public Information and Disclosure , March 2012 (PDF)

 

CNSC invites comment on Discussion Paper DIS-12-02, Process for Establishing Release Limits and Action Levels at Nuclear Facilities

The CNSC has released for public consultation Discussion Paper DIS-12-02, Process for Establishing Release Limits and Action Levels at Nuclear Facilities. This Discussion Paper sets out a proposed methodology to establish in a consistent manner limits and action levels on environmental releases at Class I nuclear facilities, uranium mines and mills, and nuclear waste management facilities to ensure the protection of the environment and health and safety of Canadians.
The comment period ends on September 13, 2012 (comment period extended thrice).
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-07, Feb. 22, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-10, March 19, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-25, June 11, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-37, Aug. 14, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-46, Oct. 3, 2012
> View CNSC What We Heard Report - DIS-12-02 , June 7, 2013 (summary of the comments received)

 

CNSC invites comment on Discussion Paper DIS-12-01, Protection of Groundwater at Nuclear Facilities

The CNSC has released for public consultation Discussion Paper DIS-12-01, Protection of Groundwater at Nuclear Facilities in Canada. This Discussion Paper sets out a proposed approach for providing direction to current licensees and new applicants of nuclear facilities in Canada to ensure the protection of groundwater. These facilities include Class I nuclear facilities, uranium mines and mills and nuclear waste management facilities. The Discussion Paper proposes to consolidate, clarify and build on existing environmental protection requirements.
The comment period ends on September 13, 2012 (comment period extended thrice).
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-06, Feb. 17, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-10, March 19, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-25, June 11, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-37, Aug. 14, 2012
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 12-45, Oct. 3, 2012
> View CNSC What We Heard Report - DIS-12-01 , June 10, 2013 (summary of the comments received)

 

CNSC releases updated information document: Licensing Process for New Uranium Mines and Mills in Canada

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has published a revision of the information document Licensing Process for New Uranium Mines and Mills in Canada (INFO-0759, Revision 1).
> View CNSC release Aug. 16, 2010
> Download Licensing Process for New Uranium Mines and Mills in Canada (INFO-0759, Revision 1) , August 2010 (413k PDF)

 

CNSC regulatory document on Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings

CNSC releases regulatory document RD/GD-370, Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings

> View CNSC release Mar. 14, 2012
> Download Regulatory Document RD/GD-370, Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings , March 2012 (PDF)

CNSC invites feedback on comments received on draft regulatory document RD/GD-370, Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings

A second consultation period is now open for stakeholders to provide feedback on the comments received about draft RD/GD-370, Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings.
The comment period ends on September 28, 2011.
> View CNSC release Sep. 14, 2011

CNSC invites comment on draft regulatory document RD/GD-370, Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings

The comment period ends on August 31, 2011.
> View CNSC release July 28, 2011
> Download RD/GD-370: Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings, Draft for Public Consultation (PDF)

CNSC invites feedback on comments received on Discussion Paper on Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings

Please provide your feedback no later than July 14, 2010.
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 10-12, June 14, 2010

CNSC invites comment on Discussion Paper on Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has released for public consultation a Discussion Paper on the Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings. This Discussion Paper is the first to be released for consultation under the CNSC's updated regulatory framework. Discussion Papers will be used to solicit comments from the public, our licensees and interested organizations early in the regulatory process.
The comment period ends on May 25, 2010.
> View CNSC Information Bulletin 10-03, March 25, 2010
> Discussion Paper DIS-10-01, Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings: View HTML · Download PDF
> Download Support Document (PDF)

 

CNSC issues Codification of Current Practice: CNSC Commitment to Aboriginal Consultation

> Codification of Current Practice: CNSC Commitment to Aboriginal Consultation: View HTML · Download PDF

 

CNSC invites comment on draft Process Improvement Initiatives for Screening Environmental Assessments at the CNSC

Comment period ends on July 18, 2008.

> View Invitation to comment on draft Process Improvement Initiatives for Screening Environmental Assessments at the CNSC
> Download draft Process Improvement Initiatives for Screening Environmental Assessments at the CNSC (PDF)

 

CNSC invites comment on Draft Regulatory Document RD-150, Designing and Implementing a Radiobioassay Program

Comment period ends on August 4, 2008.
> View CNSC release June 20, 2008
> View Draft Regulatory Document RD-150: Designing and Implementing a Radiobioassay Program

CNSC published the resulting guidance document on May 18, 2010.
> View CNSC release May 18, 2010
> Download guidance document GD-150 Designing and Implementing a Bioassay Program (1.1M PDF)

 

Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization believes uranium mining province Saskatchewan has "responsibility" to take back spent nuclear fuel

On Nov. 3, 2005, Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization released its final study on "The Future Management of Canada's Used Nuclear Fuel". Concerning site selection for a spent fuel repository, the study contains the following statement:
"We believe that the objective of fairness would best be achieved if the site selection process were focused within the provinces that are directly involved in the nuclear fuel cycle. Accordingly, in specifying economic regions for centralized facilities for initial consideration, we have proposed that the process of implementation be in the provinces that have benefited from activity associated with the nuclear fuel cycle.
This includes the three provinces that generate electricity from nuclear power and consequently create used nuclear fuel as a by-product (Ontario, New Brunswick and Québec), as well as Saskatchewan, which has benefited economically from mining the uranium that is used to make nuclear fuel. We believe that these provinces have a greater responsibility than do other provinces and territories to manage the waste stream arising from the nuclear process." (p. 146)
> Download full study: Choosing a Way Forward - The Future Management of Canada's Used Nuclear Fuel, November 2005

 

CNSC invites comment on Draft Regulatory Standard on Requirements for the Disposal of Nuclear Substances

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is issuing for public review and comment, Draft Regulatory Standard, S-307, Requirements for the Disposal of Nuclear Substances.
Comments are invited by February 4, 2005.

> View CNSC Information Bulletin 04-20, Nov. 22, 2004
> Download Draft Regulatory Standard S-307 (PDF)

For the natural uranium nuclides U-238 and U-234 and their short-lived decay products Th-234 and Pa-234/234m, the draft standard states maximum concentration levels for disposal of 1 Bq/g each. Assuming that no further decay products are present, the gamma dose rate on top of such material is approx. 0.04 mSv/year. Assuming the complete decay series are in equilibrium, the gamma dose rate reaches 3 mSv/year.
(Doses calculated on basis of FGR12 dose factors.)

 

CNSC issues Regulatory Guide and Standard on Environmental Protection Policies, Programs and Procedures at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) released after public review:

Regulatory Guide G-296, Developing Environmental Protection Policies, Programs and Procedures at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills
> View Information Bulletin 06-03, April 6, 2006
> Download Regulatory Guide, G-296 (PDF)
> View Information Bulletin 04-16, September 21, 2004
> Download Draft Regulatory Guide, G-296 Rev.1 (PDF)

Regulatory Standard S-296, Environmental Protection Policies, Programs and Procedures at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills
> View Information Bulletin 06-02, April 6, 2006
> Download Regulatory Standard, S-296 (PDF)
> View Information Bulletin 04-17, September 21, 2004
> Download Draft Regulatory Standard, S-296 Rev.1 (PDF)

 

CNSC invites comment on Draft Regulatory Guide and Standard: Environmental Monitoring Program at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills

Environmental Monitoring Program at Class I Nuclear Facilities and Uranium Mines and Mills, July 2004
Draft Regulatory Guide G-224 (PDF)
Draft Regulatory Standard S-224 (PDF)

Comments are invited by October 15, 2004.

 

CNSC issues Regulatory Guide on Licensee Public Information Programs

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has published a new regulatory document, Regulatory Guide G-217, Licensee Public Information Programs.

> View CNSC Bulletin Mar. 10, 2004
> Download Regulatory Guide G-217, Guide to Licensee Public Information Programs (PDF)

 

CNSC invites comment on Draft Regulatory Standard: Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities

Please respond by April 15, 2004.

> View CNSC Bulletin Mar. 1, 2004
> Download Draft regulatory standard, S-213, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities (PDF)

 

CNSC invites comment on Draft Regulatory Guide: Keeping Radiation Exposures and Doses "As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)"

Please respond by April 19, 2004.

> View CNSC Bulletin Feb. 16, 2004
> Download Draft Regulatory Guide, G-129 rev.1, Keeping Radiation Exposures and Doses "As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)" (PDF)

 

Canada to Align Environmental Assessment Regulations with its Nuclear Legislation

The proposed amendments were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I on August 2, 2003 (Vol. 137, No. 31): English HTML · Bilingual PDF 799 KB / Official

Comments on the proposed amendments should be received at the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency by September 2, 2003.

> View CEAA release July 31, 2003

 

Draft Regulatory Guide for Measuring Airborne Radon Progeny at Uranium Mines and Mills

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is issuing for public review and comment a draft regulatory guide, Measuring Airborne Radon Progeny at Uranium Mines and Mills (C-004 Rev.1). This document describes a method that CNSC licensees may use to assess concentrations of airborne radon progeny at uranium mines and mills in Canada.
Comments have to be submitted by April 30, 2001.
> Download draft regulatory guide C-004 Rev.1 (125k PDF)
> View CNSC Information Bulletin Feb. 8, 2001

 

New standard for uranium in drinking water

Drinking water standard for uranium of 20 µg/l approved

On October 27, 2000, the Federal–Provincial–Territorial Committee on Environmental and Occupational Health (CEOH) approved an interim maximum acceptable concentration (IMAC) of 20 µg/L (ppb) for uranium in drinking water. (Subcommittee release )
> Download Summary table of Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water (35k PDF)

Drinking water standard for uranium of 10 µg/l proposed

In January 1999, Health Canada's Federal-Provincial Subcommittee on Drinking Water issued a proposed guideline for uranium in drinking water of 10 µg per litre.
The comment period ended August 1st, 1999.
> Health Canada announcement (Jan. 11, 1999)
> Download full text (145k, PDF format)

See also: Uranium Toxicity

 

New Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Proposed Regulations

On March 20, 1997, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act was enacted by the House of Commons. The Act will replace the Atomic Energy Control Act of 1946 after its proclamation at some time in 1998.
The Revised Draft Regulations (including Uranium Mining Regulations) for the Nuclear Safety and Control Act were open for public review until December 1, 1998.
The approval in principal to these regulations is scheduled for the AECB Board meeting on March 23, 2000.

View AECB news release (Oct 15, 1998)
View Revised draft regulations and the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement
View Report on the Dispositioning of Comments on the Draft Regulations (1997 versions)
View announcement in AECB Reporter Spring 1997.
View AECB Backgrounder .

Proposed Regulatory Guides for the Preparation of Preliminary and Detailed Decommissioning Plans and for the Provision of Financial Guarantees to Implement these Plans

The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is issuing for public review and comment two proposed Regulatory Guides: Consultative Document C206 (E) entitled Financial Guarantees Guide for the Decommissioning of Licensed Activities and its companion Consultative Document C219 (E) entitled Decommissioning Planning Guide for Licensed Activities.
Comments had to be received before December 11, 1998.

> View AECB Information Bulletin 98-09 (Sep 30, 1998)
> Download C206 (E) Financial Guarantees Guide for the Decommissioning of Licensed activities (208k, PDF format)
> Download C219 (E) Decommissioning Planning Guide for Licensed Activities (242k, PDF format)


Nunavut


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Nunavut government announces pro-uranium mining policy

The Government of Nunavut has announced it is in favour of uranium mining on the condition the radioactive ore be used for peaceful and environmentally responsible purposes only. Peter Taptuna, minister of Economic Development and Transportation, presented the official policy Wednesday (June 6) in the legislative assembly.
The government policy states that Nunavummiut must be the chief beneficiaries of uranium exploration and mining and that environmental standards must be assured. It also states that uranium exploration and mining must have the support of Nunavummiut, especially those communities close to proposed development. (CBC June 7, 2012)
> View Government of Nunavut news release June 6, 2012
> Download Legislative Assembly of Nunavut Hansard June 6, 2012 (462k PDF)
> View Government of Nunavut Uranium Web Site

Nunavut Inuit charge royalties on resources extracted from their lands

Inuit in Nunavut expect to receive hundreds of millions of dollars over the next decades after passing a resolution to charge a new royalty on resources extracted from their lands.
"One of the last frontiers in the world is Nunavut and this is the way to plan for it - to create economic certainty for future generations," said Cathy Towtongie, president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., the group that administers the Nunavut Land Claim. That 1993 claim gave Inuit surface and subsurface rights to a Germany-sized chunk of what eventually became the Nunavut territory. Starting April 1, 2013, NTI will begin collecting a 12 per cent royalty on all resources taken from it, from energy to base metals to gold and diamonds.
The money involved is significant. Areva's Kiggavik uranium mine, currently under environmental assessment, would yield more than $400 million by 2023. (Canadian Press Nov. 28, 2011)


British Columbia


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

British Columbia uranium exploration ban

B.C. uranium ban should stay, First Nations leader says: The president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs does not believe the provincial moratorium on uranium mining should be lifted. "The Okanagan Nation Alliance has always been opposed to uranium exploration and mining, as has the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs," Grand Chief Stewart Phillip told the Straight by phone today (May 30). "We've never supported uranium exploration and mining, and we've always supported those groups and communities that have opposed exploration and mining. And we certainly support a continuation of the moratorium." (The Straight May 30, 2011)

British Columbia strengthens position against uranium development: Following a request by the Province's Environment and Land Use Committee, the lieutenant-governor in council has issued an order-in-council to prevent permits from being issued for uranium and thorium exploration and development in British Columbia. The order-in-council, issued under the Environment and Land Use Act (ELU Act), complements the policy position issued by the government of British Columbia in April 2008 that it would not support the mining of uranium in British Columbia. This order-in-council will support that position by preventing the issuance of a permit for the exploration of uranium or thorium, or exempting a person from the requirements for such a permit. (Star Journal March 16, 2009)

British Columbia bans uranium exploration: British Columbia shut the door on exploring for radioactive minerals on April 24, 2008, saying companies cannot claim rights to them even if the discovery is by accident. The western Canadian province does not have uranium mines, but several companies have been doing exploration work and the mineral can be found when looking for other resources. British Columbia said has revised its mining rules to prohibit companies from staking claims for uranium and thorium even when it is discovered as part of a broader project. (Reuters Apr. 24, 2008)
> View news release April 24, 2008 (BC Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources)

 


Ontario


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Ontario's new mining rules require early consultation with aboriginal groups and eliminate most exploration on private land

Last week the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines issued a "modernization" of the Mining Act. Starting in April, it will oblige companies to consult with aboriginal groups who would be affected by their projects at an early stage in exploration. This requires providing detailed plans of what the exploration will involve. Some forms of early exploration activities will also require a permit from the ministry as of April 1, 2013.
As well, the ministry says mining companies can no longer stake claims on private land. (Ottawa Citizen Oct. 9, 2012)
> See also: Mining Act Modernization (Ontario Ministry of Northern Development and Mines)
> View Ontario Mining Act

 


Saskatchewan


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Saskatchewan seeks to stimulate expansion of uranium mining industry with royalty cut

The Western Canadian province of Saskatchewan is cutting its tax on uranium mining in hopes of spurring construction of more mines and boosting its revenues, a top government official said on Friday (Mar. 22). The provincial government is proposing the first changes in 12 years to its system of charging royalties to uranium miners, calling the old formula a barrier to investment. Low uranium prices in the two years since the Fukushima meltdown in Japan have led to delays in some mine projects, but miners see a brighter outlook as new reactors are built.
The adjustments would save the two uranium miners in the province, Cameco Corp and Areva SA, only a combined C$15 million ($14.7 million) in Saskatchewan's fiscal year 2013-14. But those savings are set to grow as the formula will reflect the miners' actual costs in future years, and remove some of their risk from unforeseen events, said Kent Campbell, deputy minister of Saskatchewan's Ministry of the Economy. (Reuters Mar. 22, 2013)

Areva wins legal case against Saskatchewan over royalties for McClean Lake uranium mine

A uranium company that operates in Saskatchewan has won a legal case against the provincial government - and the province may have to pay back millions of dollars. Areva Resources Canada Ltd. runs the McClean Lake uranium mine about 700 kilometres north of Saskatoon. Areva and the province were in a disagreement about how royalties are calculated. Both used two different systems to calculate the average price of a pound of uranium. One method favoured Areva, the other favoured the province. The case went to the Court of Queen's Bench and the judge sided with Areva. (CBC May 31, 2012)
The government of Saskatchewan is launching an appeal over a recent court decision that sided with Areva in the way royalty payments are calculated.  (Global Saskatoon June 11, 2012)

Saskatchewan Environment ministry has a 'massive capability and capacity deficit' in the uranium mining sector: consultant's report

A consultant's report released on April 7, 2009, says Saskatchewan environment ministry is falling behind critical work, especially in the uranium mining sector, and should undergo a complete reorganisation.
The report found the ministry does not have the necessary skills and expertise to oversee the uranium industry. "Saskatchewan does not have adequate staff or capability to monitor and regulate the current industry," the report found. It said that only a handful of people have the appropriate expertise and experience to perform the ministry's oversight functions relating to uranium mining and milling. The ministry, the report said, "is in a massive capability and capacity deficit when considering new mining and milling projects, let alone support the value-added activities the province has announced it intends to pursue." The environmental consultant suggested Saskatchewan could contract a private sector expert [!] to support its uranium regulation work. (CBC Apr. 7, 2009)
> Download consultant's report (Sask. Environment)

Saskatchewan and Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission announce signing of agreement

On Feb. 14, 2003, the Government of Saskatchewan and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) announced the signing of an agreement "that will lead to greater administrative efficiency in regulating the uranium industry. This initiative responds to a recommendation made by the Joint Federal-Provincial Panel on Uranium Mining Developments in Northern Saskatchewan and lays the groundwork for the two groups to coordinate and harmonize their respective regulatory regimes."
> View CNSC release Feb. 14, 2003

 


Québec


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Québec uranium mining moratorium

Groups urge Québec to finally ban uranium mining

As the case of the junior uranium mining company Strateco against the Québec government proceeds this week in Court, a large coalition of Québec groups are urging Québec to ban once and for all uranium mining from the province. They point toward other States and regions that have banned uranium mining as exemples to follow. (MiningWatch Canada Jan. 10, 2017)
> View: Coalition Québec Meilleure mine release , Jan. 10, 2017 (in French)
> See also: Matoush project issues

Québec imposes moratorium on uranium development, until impact study is completed

Environment Minister Yves-François Blanchet announced Thursday (Mar. 28) that he has ordered an impact study on the exploration and development of uranium in the province. In consequence no certificate of authorization will be issued for the exploration or development of uranium in Québec until the study is completed.
The Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement (BAPE) has been given a mandate to conduct the study starting next fall. The BAPE does not have jurisdiction in northern Québec where uranium exploration is underway. The region falls under the jurisdiction of the James Bay Northern Québec Agreement. But an exception in the BAPE law allows it to conduct generic studies, such as this one. (The Montreal Gazette Mar. 28, 2013)
The James Bay Cree Nation welcomes the Government of Québec's decision to impose a moratorium on uranium exploration and mining activities in Eeyou Istchee and in Québec. However, the Cree Nation calls on the Government of Québec to ensure that the Commission concerning the uranium industry in Québec properly respects Cree rights and the James Bay and Northern Québec Agreement (JBNQA). (Grand Council of the Crees, Mar. 28, 2013)
Québec has no intention to offer financial compensation to Strateco Resources for the delay caused by the moratorium to the company's Matoush uranium exploration project. (Le Devoir Apr. 4, 2013)

Strateco Resources takes legal action over impact of Québec uranium mining moratorium on Matoush exploration project: On April 22, 2013, Strateco Resources Inc. announced that following the moratorium on the issuance of permits for uranium projects announced by the Minister of Sustainable Development, Environment, Wildlife and Parks, ("MDDEFP"), it is instigating a series of legal actions to assert its rights and protect those of its shareholders.

> See also: Public inquiry into environmental impacts of uranium projects in the Province of Québec


Newfoundland and Labrador


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Nunatsiavut uranium mining moratorium

Labrador Inuit enact legislation to lift moratorium on uranium mining

The Inuit government of Labrador has enacted legislation that lifts its moratorium on uranium mining. The Nunatsiavut government implemented a ban in 2008 following concerns about the environmental impact of uranium mining, which produces tailings that emit radiation. In December, the government unanimously voted to lift the ban, saying it has developed legislation to protect the environment and ensure the Inuit have a role in protecting land. (The Canadian Press March 8, 2012)

Labrador's Inuit government votes to lift moratorium on uranium mining

The Nunatsiavut Assembly says it unanimously voted today to lift the ban on the mining, production and development of uranium on Inuit land. The moratorium was implemented in 2008 following concerns about the environmental impact of uranium mining, which produces tailings with low-level emissions of radiation.
Natural Resources Minister Glen Sheppard says the Nunatsiavut government has developed legislation to protect the environment and has made progress on a land use plan since then. The government announced in September it would review the moratorium and held public consultations on the issue. The government says the moratorium won't be lifted until its environmental legislation comes into force, expected by March 9. (Canadian Press Dec. 14, 2011)

Inuit government in Labrador invites comment on review of uranium mining moratorium

Nunatsiavut's Lands and Natural Resources Minister Glen Sheppard is encouraging all Beneficiaries of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement and other stakeholders to make their views known during upcoming public consultations regarding the moratorium on the working, mining, milling and production of uranium on Labrador Inuit Lands.
A Special Committee of the Nunatsiavut Assembly, chaired by Mr. Sheppard, will begin public consultations on October 24 in Postville. Other meetings are scheduled for Rigolet (October 25), Makkovik (October 26), Hopedale (October 27), Nain (October 28), Happy Valley-Goose Bay (October 31), North West River (November 1) and St. John's (November 3).
In additional to providing oral presentations during the consultation meetings, Beneficiaries of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement and other stakeholders can also meet directly with members of the Special Committee. Written submissions will also be accepted. The deadline for written submissions is November 4, 2011. (Nunatsiavut Government Oct. 17, 2011)

Inuit government in Labrador to revisit 2008 uranium mining moratorium

The Inuit government of Labrador says it will review a 2008 moratorium on uranium mining that it brought in to protect the environment. The Nunatsiavut Assembly voted Tuesday night (Sep. 13) to review the legislation imposing the moratorium on mining, production and development of uranium on Inuit lands.
A government committee will begin public consultations in the next couple of weeks and is expected to file a report by December. Natural Resources Minister Glen Sheppard says if the committee recommends the moratorium be lifted, a bill will be put forward to remove the restriction. (CP Sep. 14, 2011)

Nunatsiavut government says uranium mining moratorium stays

Labrador's Nunatsiavut government says it has no intention of lifting its moratorium on uranium mining, even though the ban is causing a dramatic decline in uranium exploration and costing Labrador communities hundreds of jobs. The Inuit legislature put the ban in place April 2008 and it'll continue for two more years. The government said it needs two more years to complete a land-use study. The ban applies to the working, production, mining and development of uranium in Nunatsiavut, the land settlement area in northern Labrador. The Nunatsiavut government said it will still allow uranium exploration. (CBC May 21, 2009)

Nunatsiavut Government imposes 3-year moratorium on uranium mining on Labrador Inuit Lands

On April 8, 2008, the Nunatsiavut Government voted to place a moratorium on the working, production, mining and development of uranium on Labrador Inuit Lands. The amendment to the Labrador Inuit Lands Act, which takes effect immediately, also requires the issue to be revisited after March 31, 2011.
Inuit are concerned about the negative environmental and public health effects associated with uranium mining, Lands and Resources Minister William Barbour said, adding that a moratorium will give the Nunatsiavut Government more time to make informed decisions on the mining and milling of uranium within Labrador Inuit Lands. "During the next three years we will place focus on establishing a lands administration system, developing an Environmental Assessment Act and environmental protection legislation. We will also develop a Land Use Plan for the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area," the Minister said.
The moratorium does not apply to the exploration of uranium, the Minister noted, adding that the Nunatsiavut Government is willing and committed to working with mining companies while the moratorium is in place. (The Labradorian Apr. 8, 2008)

> Download Nunatsiavut Government news release Apr. 8, 2008 (PDF)

 


New Brunswick


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

New Brunswick government amends rules for uranium mining and exploration

The New Brunswick government is imposing new rules to help quell public fretting over the sudden burst of uranium exploration in the province, but critics say the measures don't go far enough and the Opposition is pushing for a full moratorium.
On July 4, 2008, Natural Resources Minister Donald Arsenault announced that uranium exploration and mining are no longer permitted in designated watersheds, in municipalities or within 300 metres of residential or institutional buildings.
The minister said all mining claims activity on private land will be suspended for several months until the changes are implemented and the province will also introduce an online map-staking system. Arsenault said the regulations are retroactive, which means any previous claims within the newly restricted areas are now void. (Times & Transcript Jul 4, 2008)
The new rules became official on Nov. 1, 2008. (Times & Transcript Nov. 7, 2008)

New Brunswick government issues non-binding uranium exploration guidelines

The New Brunswick government has developed new guidelines for mining companies exploring for uranium in the province. Natural Resources Minister Donald Arseneault confirmed on May 21, 2008, that the new guidelines are in now in place and have been submitted to a number of companies exploring for uranium.
But government is being criticized for not doing enough to protect the environment and health of residents. As well, critics wonder why the government would introduce guidelines, that aren't mandatory, rather than regulations. "I think the first point here is that these guidelines are pretty much standard conditions that are applied to all sorts of development projects. There's not much new that's been provided here," said Tim Van Hinte of the Petitcodiac Riverkeeper . (Times & Transcript May 22, 2008)

 


Nova Scotia


> See also Issues for: New Mining Projects · Operating Mines · Decommissioning Projects
> See also Data for: Deposits, Proposed and Active Mines · Old Mines and Decommissioning

Nova Scotia uranium moratorium

Nova Scotia has had a moratorium on uranium exploration and mining since 1982. If a company finds uranium in concentrations greater than 100 parts per million, it must report those results and stop digging. (The Daily News Jan. 3, 2008)

Nova Scotia government plans legislative ban on uranium mining

The current NDP government has plans to introduce a legislative uranium mining ban in the fall session, says a government spokesman. Currently, there is a uranium mining ban in place, however, it isn't a legislative ban which means it can be lifted by the government of the day at any time, without the consent of the legislative assembly. Department of Natural Resources spokesman David Salter confirmed it is department minister John MacDonnell's intent to honour the campaign promise from this past summer. (South Shore Now Oct. 13, 2009)

Nova Scotia municipalities petition province to ban uranium mining

On Dec. 15, 2008, Wolfville has joined seven other Nova Scotia municipalities in calling for a ban on uranium mining: Chester, West Hants, Lunenburg County, Lunenburg Town, Windsor, Kings County, and Cumberland County. (Nova Scotia News Dec. 18, 2008)

Nova Scotia considers lifting of moratorium on uranium exploration and mining

Premier Rodney MacDonald has asked the Natural Resources Department to take a look at whether it's time to lift a ban on uranium exploration that dates back to the early 1980s. (The Chronicle Herald Jan. 18, 2008)

Nova Scotia Natural Resources Minister David Morse said his government is looking to scrap its ban, pending public approval during consultations scheduled over the next three months. (Telegraph-Journal May 22, 2008)

Nova Scotia native leader calls for permanent ban on uranium mining

A Nova Scotia native leader is calling on the provincial government to impose a permanent ban on uranium mining. Chief Grace Conrad of the Native Council of Nova Scotia says she is concerned for the health of her people. She says aboriginal people are not interested in seeing the land and the water contaminated given the hazards the industry presents. Conrad is worried by the provincial government may lift a moratorium in light of soaring uranium prices. (CP Dec. 13, 2007)

As the debate surrounding uranium mining in Nova Scotia resurfaces, so has the Mi'kmaq community's opposition to opening what they say is a "Pandora's box." Roger Hunka, facilitator for the Mi'kma'ki Environments Resource Developments Secretariat , said the provincial moratorium on uranium mining was put in place for a reason. "It proved to be a health hazard, and a serious issue that Canada hasn't even gotten a solution to, is the storing of spent fuels," he said. (The Daily News Jan. 4, 2008)

 


Canada's uranium exports

General · India · China · United Arab Emirates


Canada's uranium exports: General

Saskatchewan wants climate credit for uranium exports

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall said the provincial government estimates over half-a-billion tonnes of greenhouse-gas emissions are displaced by uranium from Saskatchewan. He said the province should receive recognition for that within any forthcoming national protocols on credits and carbon trading. (Saskatoon Star Phoenix Jan. 8, 2008)

Canada throws cloak of secrecy over uranium exports

In its Mineral and Commodity Review - Uranium 2004, Natural Resources of Canada for the first time publishes no statistics about the destination countries for Canada's uranium exports.

 

Canada's uranium exports to India

First Canadian uranium shipment to arrive in India in December 2015

India is poised to receive its first uranium from Canada in about four decades, according to people with knowledge of the shipment. The nuclear fuel shipment from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan- based Cameco Corp. is scheduled to arrive by early December, said the people, who asked not to be identified because they aren't authorized to speak about the cargo. Twenty containers of uranium concentrate are in transit to western India and more shipments will take place in the coming years, one of the people said.
Cameco will make "smaller shipments of uranium concentrate this year, as we test our logistical and administrative systems," Rob Gereghty, a company spokesman said in an e-mail. Subsequent deliveries to India will take place over the next five years through 2020, according to Gereghty, who declined to provide more specifics beyond what has already been announced. (Livemint Oct. 20, 2015)
India saw its first shipment of Saskatchewan Uranium arrive Thursday (Dec. 3). (CKRM Dec. 3, 2015)

Cameco announces first uranium supply contract with India

On April 15, 2015, Cameco announced that Cameco Inc. has signed a supply agreement with the Department of Atomic Energy of India to provide 7.1 million pounds of uranium concentrate [2,731 t U] under a long-term contract through 2020.

Canada's nuclear sales treaty with India comes into effect

Canadian uranium producers will be able to export to India for the first time under an agreement that goes into effect today. Canadian Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver said today the nuclear-cooperation agreement between the two countries signed in 2010 has come into effect. (Bloomberg Sep. 27, 2013)

Canada, India sign deal for exports of Canadian uranium and nuclear technology to India, but details are fuzzy

Canada has finalized a deal with the Indian government that opens the door for exports of Canadian uranium and nuclear technology to the southeast Asian nation. More than two years after the original nuclear cooperation agreement was inked, the two nations resolved the diplomatic impasse that had held up its implementation - how India's use of uranium would be monitored to ensure its peaceful use.
But the new agreement is fuzzy on how that oversight will occur. It says the two countries will establish a joint committee to "share expertise in areas such as research and development, safety, and next generation nuclear facilities," according to a release issued by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. "Through this arrangement, Canada will receive the necessary assurances on the peaceful use of Canadian exports to India of nuclear material, equipment and technology," the statement said.
Yet even with this deal in hand, it wasn't clear when uranium exports could begin. Canada's nuclear watchdog must first sign the agreement with India's Department of Atomic Energy. Only then will the governments "take the necessary steps to bring the (agreement) into force in a timely manner." (Toronto Star Nov. 6, 2012)
> View CNSC release Nov. 6, 2012
> View Prime Minister announcement Nov. 6, 2012 · Prime Minister Backgrounder Nov. 6, 2012
On March 21, 2013, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and India's Department of Atomic Energy have finalized an Appropriate Arrangement pursuant to the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of India for Cooperation in the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. It is the next step towards full implementation of the Nuclear Cooperation Agreement. (CNSC Apr. 8, 2013)

Canada, India agreement on uranium exports still in limbo for verification issues

Canada and India reached a nuclear co-operation deal with great fanfare two years ago that was supposed to pave the way for a vast new export business for Canadian uranium and reactor companies. Even more importantly, that breakthrough helped the two countries move past decades of awkward and sometimes chilly relations over India's misuse of nuclear fuel obtained from Canada in the 1970s.
But the deal hasn't come into force yet because India has balked at Canada's insistence that it should have the right to verify India's handling of any Canadian nuclear material. India already reports its activities to the International Atomic Energy Agency and doesn't believe it should have to pass muster with Canada as well. (The Globe and Mail Nov. 5, 2012)

Ontario ready to supply uranium to India

Ontario, one of Canada's most important provinces, has said it is ready to supply nuclear fuel uranium along with cobalt to India. "From uranium and nickel to cobalt and potash, Ontario and the rest of Canada stand ready to supply India during its next industrial surge forward," Ontario Minister for Government Services, Harinder Takhar said on the occasion of signing a memorandum of understanding (MoU) between India and Ontario. (Deccan Herald July 11, 2010)

Canada, India sign nuclear agreement allowing uranium exports to India

India and Canada on Sunday (June 27) signed a civil nuclear cooperation agreement that will provide for cooperation in civil nuclear energy including import of uranium and equipment from Canada. (Times of India June 28, 2010)

Imminent Canada-India nuclear pact heightens tensions

An imminent deal that would open the door for Canadian exports of uranium to India, could add to nuclear tensions in South Asia, some experts say. The deal could be worth billions for Canadian industry and would formally end the mistrust that followed India's nuclear test in 1974, when it became apparent that India had misused a Canadian research reactor to obtain weapons-grade plutonium.
Some experts on nuclear technology say the new deal could repeat history, however, with Canada unwittingly adding to the nuclear tensions in the region by easing India's shortage of uranium. "They're not going to say this is for weapons, but they're unlikely to rule it out," said M.V. Ramana, a researcher at Princeton University. Any such civil nuclear deal would include safeguards to prevent the exported uranium from being used for military purposes, Mr. Ramana said, but Canada's supply would leave India free to use more, or all, of its own domestic uranium for weapons. The country is believed to produce about 300 to 450 metric tonnes annually, which Mr. Ramana estimated would be enough to make at least 60 Hiroshima-sized bombs. (Globe and Mail June 24, 2010)

Canada, India ink nuclear agreement

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced over the weekend Ottawa and Delhi have reached a nuclear agreement. Harper and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh inked the deal in Trinidad and Tobago. Under the agreement, Canadian firms could resume sales of nuclear and uranium technologies to India which was stopped in the middle of the 1970s. Harper said Ottawa will release the text of the nuclear agreement with India after the implementing legislation is table in Canada's Parliament. (AHN Nov. 30, 2009)

Canada to allow uranium exports to India soon

Prime Minister Stephen Harper wrapped up a three-day visit to India confirming Canadian companies may be allowed to start selling uranium and other nuclear material and technology to India before Christmas. (Toronto Star Nov. 18, 2009)

Cameco hopes to supply uranium to India

CEO Jerry Grandey told CBC News on Tuesday (Nov. 3) that negotiations for an export deal have been underway between authorities in Canada and India for more than a year and an order for more than seven million pounds of uranium [2692 t U] is imminent. (CBC Nov. 3, 2009)

 

Canada's uranium exports to China

First shipment of Canadian uranium arrives in China

Saskatchewan has made its first shipment of uranium to China since a supplementary protocol to the nearly 20-year-old Canada-China Nuclear Co-operation Agreement was signed by the Harper government last year, Premier Brad Wall announced Wednesday (Oct. 16). "Earlier this week, the first shipment of Saskatchewan uranium landed at Shanghai port to be used in the Chinese civilian nuclear industry," Wall told reporters at the Legislative Building Wednesday. (Regina Leader Post Oct. 17, 2013)

Canada and China sign agreement on uranium shipments

China and Canada signed an agreement that will facilitate the export of Canadian uranium to the world's second biggest economy. The two countries today signed a "supplementary protocol" to a pact on nuclear cooperation reached in 1994, Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird said in an emailed statement. (The Province July 19, 2012)

Canada allows exports of uranium to China

Canada said it will allow the sale to China of uranium for use in nuclear-energy generation, clearing the way for Canadian producers to compete with China's current suppliers in Kazakhstan, Australia and Russia. The new agreement allows the sale to China of yellowcake, a concentrated uranium powder used to make fuel rods for nuclear reactors. It can also be used to make weapons. The pact will ensure that uranium exported to China will be used only for peaceful, civilian purposes, the Canadian prime minister's office said.
In 1976, after India used a Canadian-made nuclear reactor to construct its first nuclear bomb, Canada barred exports of uranium and nuclear reactors to countries that hadn't agreed to stop the spread of nuclear weapons technology - a list that at the time included China. A 1994 agreement between Canada and China allowed the sale of reactors, but until this week's amendment to that pact, Canada hadn't yet relaxed its restriction on selling nuclear fuel to China. (The Wall Street Journal Feb. 10, 2012)

Cameco signs agreement to supply uranium to China

> View here

Saskatchewan Premier in favour of Canadian uranium sales to China

"We're hoping our federal government concludes a nuclear co-operation agreement with China so Saskatchewan uranium can be sold in that market," said Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall. "Even though we're the world's largest supplier of uranium, we sell none of it to China because there's no agreement in place. It could represent literally billions of dollars for Saskatchewan's economy." (Star Phoenix May 22, 2010)

China hoping for Canada to lift restrictions on uranium exports

Natural Resources Minister Gary Lunn, wrapping up a three-day visit to Beijing, disclosed on Nov. 15, 2006, that he has agreed to include uranium on the agenda of a working group of Chinese and Canadian officials who will discuss energy co-operation between the two countries.
Chinese officials are fully aware that Canada has restrictions on the export of uranium to countries such as China, and they raised the question of those restrictions in their meetings with Mr. Lunn this week - clearly hoping that Canada might be willing to lift the restrictions. (The Globe and Mail Nov. 15, 2006)

Canada has no objections to uranium exports to China

The Canadian government would not stand in the way of future sales of Canadian-origin natural uranium or enriched uranium product to China's nuclear power program, well-placed diplomatic sources told NuclearFuel. Should Cameco and China in the future strike a separate deal for sale of Cameco's production of uranium in Kazakhstan to China, the sources said, Canada would not likely require Canadian approval prior to export of the material to China. Canada's nuclear commerce with China is governed by a bilateral nuclear cooperation agreement. Under this agreement, officials pointed out, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) exported first cores, containing Canadian-origin natural uranium, for the two Candu-6 PHWRs at Qinshan, as well as a Candu fuel fabrication plant that is now operating at Baotou to fabricate all the fresh fuel for the two PHWRs. All the Canadian-origin uranium and fuel fabrication equipment and technology supplied to China is subject to peaceful-use provisions of the Sino-Canadian cooperation agreement, officials said. "There is no reason why any further sales of Canadian-origin uranium couldn't take place, provided that China would consider the transaction likewise subject to our peaceful-use provisions, and there is no reason why China would not agree to do that," one source said. (Nuclear Fuel Aug. 15, 2005)

 

Canada's uranium exports to United Arab Emirates

Canada, United Arab Emirates conclude nuclear cooperation agreement

On September 18, 2012, Canada and the United Arab Emirates concluded a nuclear cooperation agreement (NCA). "This agreement provides a number of opportunities [...] for Canadian companies to offer the full array of their equipment, services and uranium supply."
On September 19, 2012, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have signed an Administrative Arrangement pursuant to the Agreement Between the Government Of Canada and the Government Of United Arab Emirates for Cooperation in the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy.


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